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  • George Arbuthnott and Jonathan Leake, The Sunday Times, Published: 4 January 2015
SCIENTISTS mapping the genome for the world's longest-lived mammal, the bowhead whale, have found the longevity genes that give it a 200-year-plus lifespan — and say the discoveries might be used to extend human life.

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  • The Journal of Urology. December 12014
The results of a study reported this year in The Journal of Urology® offer some reassurance to men who enjoy the benefits of testosterone replacement therapy but are concerned that the hormone might increase their risk of prostate cancer. In an analysis of three prospective ongoing registry studies, men receiving testosterone failed to experience an increased risk of the disease, leading the authors to conclude that, within properly applied guidelines, testosterone therapy appears to be safe.

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  • Life Extension, Foundation for Longer Life. Published: 25 November 2014
A study reported on November 19, 2014 in the British Medical Journal has uncovered an association between genetically low vitamin D levels and an increased risk of mortality over follow-up among Danish men and women.

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  • The Lancet Neurology. Published: 08 August 2014
Background: Sleep deprivation and fatigue are common subjective complaints among astronauts. Previous studies of sleep and hypnotic drug use in space have been limited to post-flight subjective survey data or in-flight objective data collection from a small number of crew members. We aimed to characterise representative sleep patterns of astronauts on both short-duration and long-duration spaceflight missions.

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  • Medical Express. September 2014
  For the first time ever, a paralyzed man can move his fingers and hand with his own thoughts thanks to an innovative partnership between The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Battelle. Ian Burkhart, a 23-year-old quadriplegic from Dublin, Ohio, is the first patient to use Neurobridge, an electronic neural bypass for spinal cord injuries that reconnects the brain directly to muscles, allowing voluntary and functional control of a paralyzed limb. Burkhart is the first of a potential five participants in a clinical study. "It's much like a heart bypass, but instead of bypassing blood, we're actually bypassing electrical signals," said Chad Bouton, research leader at Battelle. "We're taking those signals from the brain, going around the injury, and actually going directly to the muscles."

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  • Medical Express. September 2014
  People with diets higher in protein, especially from fish, may be less likely to have a stroke than those with diets lower in protein, according to a meta-analysis published in the June 11, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.    "The amount of protein that led to the reduced risk was moderate—equal to 20 grams per day," said study author Xinfeng Liu, MD, PhD, of Nanjing University School of Medicine in Nanjing, China. "Additional, larger studies are needed before definitive recommendations can be made, but the evidence is compelling." The meta-analysis looked at all of the available research on the relationship between protein in the diet and the risk of stroke. Seven studies with a total of 254,489 participants who were followed for an average of 14 years were included in the analysis.

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  • The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. September 2014
. Martin Lajous,  Anne Bijon,  Guy Fagherazzi,  Emilie Rossignol,  Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, and  Françoise Clavel-Chapelon   + Author Affiliations 1From the Center for Research on Population Health, Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca, México (ML); the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (ML); the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Center for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, Unit 1018, Villejuif, France (ML, AB, GF, ER, M-CB-R, and FC-C); and the Paris-South University, Unité Mixte de Recherche et de Service 1018, Villejuif, France (AB, GF, ER, M-CB-R, and FC-C).   + Author Notes ↵2 The Etude Epidémiologique auprès des femmes de la Mutuelle Générale de l'Education Nationale cohort was performed with the financial support of the Mutuelle Générale de l'Education Nationale, the European Community, the French League against Cancer, the Gustave Roussy Institute, and the French Institute of Health and Medical Research. The validation of potential diabetes cases was supported by the European Union (Integrated Project LSHM-CT-2006-037197 in the Framework Program 6 of the European Community) InterAct project. The current analysis was conducted with support from the International Associated Laboratory in Nutrition, Hormones and Chronic Disease in Women, which is an ongoing collaboration…

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  • IM Medico Hospitalario. Agosto 2014
En la investigación han encontrado una vía molecular específica del tejido epitelial en el esófago que implica a un gen llamado CAPN14. El origen de la alergia se encuentra en la inflamación crónica de este órgano. Científicos del Centro Médico del Hospital Infantil de Cincinnati han publicado una nueva investigación en 'Nature Genetics' en la que identifican una vía molecular específica del tejido epitelial en el esófago que implica a un gen llamado CAPN14, o lo que es lo mismo,una nueva vía genética y molecular en el esófago que causa la esofagitis eosinofílica (EOE), abriendo posibles nuevas estrategias terapéuticas para la ardua tarea de tratar la alergia a los alimentos.

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  • MedPage Today. August 2014
By John Gever, Deputy Managing Editor, MedPage Today Action Points Note that this study was published as an abstract and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. COPENHAGEN -- Among individuals who developed hypertension at age 90 or later, their risk of also developing dementia was dramatically lower than other very elderly people whose blood pressure remained normal, researchers said here. With mean follow-up 2.8 years (range up to 10 years), the age- and education-adjusted relative risk of incident dementia in 625 prospectively followed individuals was 0.45 (P<0.01) for those with onset of hypertension in their 90s, compared with similarly aged participants remaining hypertension-free, reported María M. Corrada, MS, ScD, of the University of California Irvine. In fact, among individuals surviving to age 90, hypertension was clearly not a risk factor for dementia no matter when it began, Corrada said at a press briefing held prior to her formal presentation at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. Although cardiovascular abnormalities including hypertension have previously been linked to increased dementia risk, those studies primarily involved onset of elevated blood pressure in young adulthood and middle age. Corrada noted that…

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  • Americaneart Association. August 2014
American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report Study Highlight•Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of stroke worldwide, according to a new analysis of 20 studies conducted in Europe, the United States and Asia. Embargoed until 3 p.m. CT/4 p.m. ET THURSDAY, MAY 8, 2014 DALLAS, May 8, 2014 — Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce the risk of stroke worldwide, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke. Researchers conducted a meta-analysis of 20 studies published over the last 19 years to assess the effects of fruit and vegetable consumption on risk of stroke globally. The combined studies involved 760,629 men and women who had 16,981 strokes. Stroke risk decreased by 32 percent with every 200 grams of fruit consumed each day and 11 percent with every 200 grams of vegetables consumed each day. “Improving diet and lifestyle is critical for heart and stroke risk reduction in the general population,” said Yan Qu, M.D., the study’s senior author, director of the intensive care unit at Qingdao Municipal Hospital and professor at the Medical College of Qingdao University in Qingdao, China. “In particular, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables is highly recommended because…

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  • MedicalXpress. July 2014
(Medical Xpress)—University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that stem cells taken from teeth can grow to resemble brain cells, suggesting they could one day be used in the brain as a therapy for stroke. In the University's Centre for Stem Cell Research, laboratory studies have shown that stem cells from teeth can develop and form complex networks of brain-like cells. Although these cells haven't developed into fully fledged neurons, researchers believe it's just a matter of time and the right conditions for it to happen.

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  • PubMed. July 2014
Abstract In the adult central nervous system, the vasculature of the neurogenic niche regulates neural stem cell behavior by providing circulating and secreted factors. Age-related decline of neurogenesis and cognitive function is associated with reduced blood flow and decreased numbers of neural stem cells. Therefore, restoring the functionality of the niche should counteract some of the negative effects of aging.

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  • Immedicohospitalario.es. Julio 2014
El adenocarcinoma pancreático ductal es uno de los cánceres con peor prognosis, con una supervivencia del 6,7% a los 5 años. La mayoría de los pacientes presenta mutaciones que activan el oncogen K-ras y que, en modelos animales, han mostrado ser las que inician el crecimiento tumoral y la progresión de la enfermedad. Investigadores del MD Anderson Cancer Center han demostrado que los tumores pancreáticos dependientes de K-ras disponen de una vía de proliferación alternativa. El hallazgo, publicado en la revista Cell, tuvo lugar al observar recurrencia en una proporción de ratones en los que el crecimiento tumoral pancreático había sido inicialmente detenido desactivando K-ras. Los tumores recurrentes mostraron ser más agresivos y tener mayor capacidad de originar metástasis pulmonares.

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  • Immedicohospitalario.es. Junio 2014
Un estudio piloto muestra que su aplicación es segura y que reduce el número de lesiones captadoras de gadolinio. La hipótesis de la higiene postula que el entorno bajo en carga microbiana, característico de los países desarrollados, desregula el sistema inmunitario e incrementa la susceptibilidad de sufrir enfermedades autoinmunes como la esclerosis múltiple (EM). Por otro lado, es conocido desde hace tiempo que los helmintos tienen capacidad inmunomodulatoria. Neurólogos norteamericanos han llevado a cabo un estudio de eficacia y seguridad (HINT-2) en el que administraron oralmente cada dos semanas 2,500 huevos de tricocéfalo (Trichuris suis) a pacientes recientemente diagnosticados con EM remitente / recidivante que no habían recibido ningún tratamiento previo. La comparación del número de lesiones detectables por resonancia magnética entre los 5 meses anteriores al tratamiento y los 5 meses durante los que se siguió el tratamiento mostró una reducción relativa del 34%.

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  • Eurekalert. June 2014
Exposing skin to sunlight may help to reduce blood pressure and thus cut the risk of heart attack and stroke, a study published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology suggests. Research carried out at the Universities of Southampton and Edinburgh shows that sunlight alters levels of the small messenger molecule, nitric oxide (NO) in the skin and blood, reducing blood pressure.

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  • ScienceDaily. June 2014
Practising sport for more than an hour day reduces the risk of contracting breast cancer, and this applies to women of any age and any weight, and also unaffected by geographical location, according to research presented to the 9th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC-9). Compared with the least active women, those with the highest level of physical activity reduced their risk of breast cancer by 12%, researchers say.

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  • ScienceDaily. June 2014
Reducing or curbing just six modifiable risk factors -- tobacco use, harmful alcohol use, salt intake, high blood pressure and blood sugar, and obesity -- to globally-agreed target levels could prevent more than 37 million premature deaths over 15 years, from the four main non-communicable diseases (NCDs): cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory disease, cancers, and diabetes, according to new research published in The Lancet. Worryingly, the findings indicate that not reaching these targets would result in 38.8 million deaths in 2025 from the four main NCDs, 10.5 million deaths more than the 28.3 million who died in 2010.This is the first study to analyse the impact that reducing globally targeted risk factors will have on the UN's 25x25 target to reduce premature deaths from NCDs by 25% relative to 2010 levels by 2025.

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  • Univadis. May 2014
  The longer young children watch television, the less they sleep. US researchers discovered this small yet consistent association in a long-term study, the results of which were published in "Pediatrics". Scientists at Harvard University (Boston) followed 1,800 children aged between six months and nearly eight years who participated in Project Viva, a long-term study on health effects of several factors during pregnancy and after birth. The mothers regularly reported on the sleep duration of their children, how much time they watched television daily or were in a room where a television was switched on, and whether they slept in a room with a TV.

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  • The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. May 2014
J Bruce German Abstract Lactation biology, microbial selection, and human diversity are central themes that could guide investment in scientific research, industrial innovation, and regulatory policy oversight to propel yogurt into the central role for health-promoting food products. The ability of yogurt to provide the nourishing properties of milk together with the live microorganisms from fermentation provides a unique combination of food assets. Academic research must now define the various targets on which these biological assets act to improve health and develop the metrics that can quantitatively document their benefits.

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  • PubMed. May 2014
Wang PY1, Neretti N, Whitaker R, Hosier S, Chang C, Lu D, Rogina B, Helfand SL. Author information:1Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA.Abstract Calorie restriction (CR) improves health and extends life span in a variety of species. Despite many downstream molecules and physiological systems having been identified as being regulated by CR, the mechanism by which CR extends life span remains unclear. The Drosophila gene Indy (for I'm not dead yet), involved in the transport and storage of Krebs cycle intermediates in tissues important in fly metabolism, was proposed to regulate life span via an effect on metabolism that could overlap with CR.

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  • IM Médico Estimulante. Mayo 2014
La actividad del transportador de la serotonina en las plaquetas se correlaciona con la del circuito cerebral relacionado con la introspección. La deficiencia de serotonina es una de los mecanismos subyacentes a la depresión. De ahí que comúnmente se prescriban inhibidores de la recaptación de serotonina para su tratamiento. El transportador de la serotonina (SERT) se encuentra no sólo en el sistema nervioso central, sino en una amplia variedad de tipos celulares, incluyendo las plaquetas sanguíneas, donde regula la concentración plasmática de serotonina.

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  • PrWeb. April 2014
New study by researchers Dr. Eric Finzi and Dr. Norman E. Rosenthal published in the Journal of Psychiatric Research May 2014 edition reports that patients injected with onabotulinumtoxinA demonstrated substantial improvement - 52% - in their depressive symptoms. “This new research supports earlier facial feedback theory of Charles Darwin and William James which suggests that facial expressions influence mood,” says co-author, Dr. Eric Finzi. In the largest randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study to date on the effect of OnabotulinumtoxinA (known as Botox) on depression, researchers found that more than half of subjects suffering from moderate to severe depression showed a substantial improvement (greater than or equal to 50% of baseline) in their depressive symptoms as measured by the MADRS scale. The study showed that Botox may help relieve depressive symptoms both as a stand-alone and an adjunctive treatment.

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  • Medical Xpress. April 2014
Charlotte Erlanson-Albertsson, a professor of appetite regulation at Lund University, found the compound, known as thylakoid, while looking for ways to slow digestion and alleviate hunger pangs. The compound functions differently to processed foods, which tend to be digested only in the upper intestine.This prevents key hormones that make us feel full from being released to the brain, according to a statement from the university."I like to say our intestines are unemployed," Erlanson-Albertsson said.

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  • The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. April 2014
Karina V Soerensen, Tanja K Thorning, Arne Astrup, Mette Kristensen, and Janne K Lorenzen From the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. Supported by The Danish Council for Strategic Research in Health, Food and Welfare, Danish Dairy Research Foundation. Address correspondence to M Kristensen, Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. E-mail: Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla.. Background: Calcium from different dairy sources might affect blood lipids and fecal fat excretion differently because of differences in the food matrix and nutritional composition. Objective: We investigated whether milk- and cheese-based diets with similar calcium contents affect a saturated fatty acid–induced increase in blood lipids differently.

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  • National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. March 2014
The accumulation of age-associated changes in a biochemical process that helps control genes may be responsible for some of the increased risk of cancer seen in older people, according to a National Institutes of Health study. Scientists have known for years that age is a leading risk factor for the development of many types of cancer, but why aging increases cancer risk remains unclear. Researchers suspect that DNA methylation, or the binding of chemical tags, called methyl groups, onto DNA, may be involved. Methyl groups activate or silence genes, by affecting interactions between DNA and the cell’s protein-making machinery. Zongli Xu, Ph.D., and Jack Taylor, M.D., Ph.D., researchers from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of NIH, identified DNA methylation sites across the human genome that changed with age. They demonstrated that a subset of those sites — the ones that become increasingly methylated with advancing age — are also disproportionately methylated in a variety of human cancers. Their findings were published online in the journal Carcinogenesis. "You can think of methylation as dust settling on an unused switch, which then prevents the cell from turning on certain genes," Taylor said. "If a cell can no longer…

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  • Im Farmacia Clínica. March 2014
El nuevo estudio científico se llevó a cabo con el fármaco SIRT1720, aunque de momento solo ha sido probado en ratones. Científicos del Instituto Nacional de Envejecimiento de Estados Unidos han llevado a cabo un estudio del fármaco SIRT1720 cuya principal conclusión es que este fármaco no solamente prolonga la esperanza de vida, sino que también retrasa el inicio del envejecimiento y de los problemas de salud ligados a la edad. A pesar de que el estudio fue realizado solo en ratones, los expertos creen que en el futuro podría testarse en humanos.

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  • MedPage Today. March 2014
By Kristina Fiore, Staff Writer, MedPage TodayTwo vitamin D studies from Ireland made headlines this week: One looked at the vitamin's role in inflammation, and the other on how it impacted calcium levels after thyroid surgery. While its musculoskeletal benefits are clear, vitamin D's role in inflammation and immune system modulation is less so. Mary Ward, PhD, of the University of Ulster in Coleraine, Northern Ireland, and colleagues looked at data on 957 older hypertensive patients (mean age 70) from an Irish cohort study. They found that patients with vitamin D deficiency had higher levels of the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) than those who had sufficient levels of the vitamin.

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  • Medical Xpress. March 2014
Doctors should consider prescribing exercise as well as medication for some common conditions, a new study suggests. It found that exercise affects outcomes about equally as well as prescription drugs for coronary heart disease, pre-diabetes and stroke. The research did not specify which types of exercise work best for the different conditions. The study was what is called a network meta-analysis, which allows researchers to compare evidence from many existing studies on different types of treatments for the same disease. The review examined 305 randomized controlled trials with 339,274 participants."We wanted to see how much evidence there is, with rigorously designed studies, on exercise versus the most commonly used type of intervention in medicine—medication," says study co-author John Ioannidis, an adjunct professor at Tufts School of Medicine and director of the Stanford Prevention Research Center.

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  • The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, February 2014
Anna L Macready, Trevor W George, Mary F Chong, Dauren S Alimbetov, Yannan Jin, Alberto Vidal, Jeremy PE Spencer, Orla B Kennedy, Kieran M Tuohy, Anne-Marie Minihane, Michael H Gordon, Julie A Lovegrove, for the FLAVURS Study Group+ Author Affiliations 1From the Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition (ALM, TWG, MFC, DSA, YJ, AV, JPES, OBK, KMT, A-MM, MHG, and JAL), and the Institute for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences (ALM and JAL), University of Reading, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom.+ Author Notes ↵2 ALM and TWG are joint first authors.

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  • MedPage Today, February 2014
By John Gever, Deputy Managing Editor, MedPage Today Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Plannersave|AA Action PointsPatients with relatively high vitamin D levels in the year after a first multiple sclerosis-like attack showed, over the next 4 years, markedly lower levels of MS disease activity and disability progression than those with lower levels.Note that the study does not prove that vitamin D levels were directly causative of the clinical and MRI results, or that patients would benefit from vitamin D supplements.Patients with relatively high vitamin D levels in the year after a first multiple sclerosis-like attack showed, over the next 4 years, markedly lower levels of MS disease activity and disability progression than those with lower levels, researchers found.

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  • MedPage Today, February 2014
By Shalmali Pal, Contributing Editor, MedPage Today Turning off the heat and spending more time in cooler temperatures may promote calorie usage, researchers said. Frequent exposure to mild cold can effect energy expenditure over time, and nonshivering thermogenesis -- or a cold-induced increase in heat production -- may activate calorie-burning brown fat, according to Wouter van Marken Lichtenbelt, PhD, from Masstricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands, and colleagues.

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  • Medpage Today. January 2014
By Nancy Walsh, Staff Writer, MedPage Today Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Plannersave|AA Action PointsPatients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee -- some 10% to 12% of the world's population -- are at heightened risk for cardiovascular disease.Note that men who had undergone joint replacement only had significantly higher risk for congestive heart failure.Patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee -- some 10% to 12% of the world's population -- are at heightened risk for cardiovascular disease, a prospective longitudinal study suggested. After adjustment for risk factors, men older than 65 with osteoarthritis had a 15% increased risk for hospitalization for cardiovascular disease (RR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04-1.27), according to M. Mushfiqur Rahman, who is a PhD candidate at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and colleagues.

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  • Aha Journals. January 2014
Esteban Escolar, MD, Gervasio A. Lamas, MD, Daniel B. Mark, MD, MPH, Robin Boineau, MD, MA, Christine Goertz, DC, PHD, Yves Rosenberg, MD, Richard L. Nahin, PhD, MPH, Pamela Ouyang, MBBS, Theodore Rozema, MD, Allan Magaziner, DO, Richard Nahas, MD, Eldrin F. Lewis, MD, MPH, Lauren Lindblad, MS and Kerry L. Lee, PhDAuthor Affiliations From the Columbia University Division of Cardiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL (E.E., G.A.L.); National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (R.B., Y.R.); Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research, Davenport, IA (C.G.); The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Bethesda, MD (R.L.N.); Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (P.O.); Biogenesis Medical Center, Landrum, SC (T.R.); Magaziner Center for Wellness, Cherry Hill, NJ (A.M.); Seekers Centre for Integrative Medicine, Ottawa, ON (R.N.); Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (E.F.L.); and Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, NC (D.B.M., K.L.L., L.L.).Correspondence to Gervasio A. Lamas, MD, Columbia University, Division of Cardiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, 4300 Alton Rd, Suite 2070A, Miami Beach, FL 33140. E-mail Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla.

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  • Consumer Healthy. January 2014
Study followed Swedish seniors for six years Low Vitamin B-12 Levels Tied to Bone Fractures in Older MenFRIDAY, Dec. 13, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Older men with low levels of vitamin B-12 are at increased risk for bone fractures, a new study suggests. Researchers measured the levels of vitamin B-12 in 1,000 Swedish men with an average age of 75. They found that participants with low levels of the vitamin were more likely than those with normal levels to have suffered a fracture.

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  • January 2014
Un equipo liderado por el Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), con la colaboración de investigadores de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid y el Museo Nacional de Historia Natural de París, ha descrito nuevas acciones de las hormonas tiroideas. El artículo, portada del último número de The Journal of Cell Biology, aporta las bases moleculares necesarias para comprender los efectos de estas hormonas en el daño genómico y la senescencia celular.

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  • Reuters. December 2013
BY C. E. HUGGINS (Reuters Health) - It's never too late to start exercising, according to a new study that found formerly inactive seniors who took up exercise still experienced health benefits. The study sheds light on the question of whether the slower mental and physical decline seen among active seniors extends to former couch potatoes who begin exercising later in life.

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  • Colorado Cancer Blogs. December 2013
Grapes An active ingredient of grape seed extract, B2G2, acts against cancer cells.A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published online ahead of print in the journal Nutrition and Cancer describes the laboratory synthesis of the most active component of grape seed extract, B2G2, and shows this synthesized compound induces the cell death known as apoptosis in prostate cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed. “We’ve shown similar anti-cancer activity in the past with grape seed extract (GSE), but now we know B2G2 is its most biologically active ingredient which can be synthesized in quantities that will allow us to study the detailed death mechanism in cancer cells,” says Alpna Tyagi, PhD, of the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Tyagi works in the lab of CU Cancer Center investigator and Skaggs School of Pharmacy faculty member, Chapla Agarwal, PhD. The group has spent more than a decade demonstrating the anti-cancer activity of GSE in controlled, laboratory conditions. For example, previous studies have shown the GSE effectiveness against cancer cells and have also shown its mechanism of action. “But until recently, we didn’t know which constituent of GSE created this effect. This naturally occurring compound, GSE,…

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  • MedPage Today. December 2013
By Ed Susman , Contributing Writer, MedPage TodayReviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner Action PointsNote that this study was published as an abstract and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.There is a significant inverse relationship between self-reported vigorous-intensity physical activity and elevated levels of C-reactive protein.LOS ANGELES -- Individuals who vigorously exercise significantly reduce the odds that they will have high levels of C-reactive protein -- a marker of inflammation in the body, researchers reported here. If a person exercised vigorously less than 500 MET (metabolic equivalents) per week, there was a 27% reduction in the odds of having elevated C-reactive protein levels (odds ratio [OR] 0.72, 95% CI 0.59-0.88, P=0.002) when compared with non-exercisers, said lead author Michael Richardson, BSH, a graduate assistant at Brooks College of Health at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. In his poster presentation at the annual meeting of the World Congress on Insulin Resistance, Richardson also noted that if a person did 500 METs or more per week, the…

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  • Reuters. November 2013
BY C. E. HUGGINS (Reuters Health) - A music-based training program that challenges both the body and the mind may improve brain function and mood among seniors, suggests a new study from Switzerland. "The take-home message is that 6-months of music-based multitask training (i.e., Jaques-Dalcroze eurhythmics) - a specific training regimen which was previously shown to be effective in improving gait and reducing falls - has beneficial effects on cognition and mood in older adults," Dr. Mélany Hars, of Geneva University Hospitals, told Reuters Health in an email. Jacques-Dalcroze eurhythmics was developed in the early part of the 20th century by the Swiss composer Emile Jaques-Dalcroze as a way to better understand music through movement. It is practiced worldwide, particularly in the fields of music, theater, dance and therapy, according to Hars. A typical Jacques-Dalcroze session involves participants adapting their movements to the rhythmic changes of improvised piano music. In Hars' study, the participants were challenged to perform specific multitasking skills, such as walking to the rhythm of a piano while handling a percussion instrument and responding to changes in the piano's rhythm.

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  • Reuters. November 2013
  BY KATHRYIN DOYLE (Reuters Health) - Women who eat foods rich in antioxidants may have a lower risk of cataracts as they age, according to a new Swedish analysis. "Oxidative damage of the eye lens caused by free radicals has been suggested to be crucial in development of cataract," said Susanne Rautiainen of the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institutet, who led the study. Her team looked at the diets of more than 30,000 middle aged and older women, and found those with the highest total intake of antioxidants had about a 13 percent lower risk of developing cataracts than women who consumed the least.

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  • MedaPage Today. November 2013
By Kristina Fiore, Staff Writer, MedPage TodayReviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Plannersave|AAPost-Menopause Brain Drain Tied to ProgesteroneAction PointsEstrogen levels after menopause may have no impact on cognitive function, but progesterone levels might.Point out that progesterone did appear to be related to verbal memory and global cognition among women who were newly postmenopausal.Estrogen levels after menopause may have no impact on cognitive function, but progesterone levels might, researchers found.

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  • AJCN Nutrition. October 2013
Davide Grassi, Giovambattista Desideri, Paolo Di Giosia, Martina De Feo, Emanuela Fellini, Paola Cheli, Livia Ferri, and Claudio FerriAuthor Affiliations From the Department of Life, Health, and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy (DG, GD, PDG, MDF, EF, PC, and CF); and University “Sapienza”–II Faculty of Medicine, Rome, Italy (LF).Author Notes Presented at the conference “Fifth International Scientific Symposium on Tea and Human Health,” held at the US Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC, 19 September 2012. The conference was organized by Jeffrey Blumberg, Tufts University, Boston, MA, and a Steering Committee including representatives from each of the symposium cosponsors: the American Cancer Society, the American College of Nutrition, the American Institute for Cancer Research, the American Medical Women's Association, the American Society for Nutrition, and the Linus Pauling Institute. The symposium was underwritten by the Tea Council of the USA. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Tea Council of the USA or the cosponsoring organizations. This symposium was supported by the American Cancer Society, the American College of Nutrition, the American Institute for Cancer Research, the American Medical Women's Association, the American Society for Nutrition, the…

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  • Publimed. October 2013
Hursel R, Westerterp-Plantenga MS.SourceDepartment of Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.AbstractMaintaining the level of daily energy expenditure during weight loss and weight maintenance is as important as maintaining satiety while decreasing energy intake. In this context, different catechin- and caffeine-rich teas (CCRTs), such as green, oolong, and white teas, as well as caffeine have been proposed as tools for maintaining or enhancing energy expenditure and for increasing fat oxidation.

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  • AJCN Nutrition. October 2013
Jian-Min Yuan + Author Affiliations From the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.+ Author Notes Presented at the conference “Fifth International Scientific Symposium on Tea and Human Health,” held at the US Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC, 19 September 2012. The conference was organized by Jeffrey Blumberg, Tufts University, Boston, MA, and a Steering Committee including representatives from each of the symposium cosponsors: the American Cancer Society, the American College of Nutrition, the American Institute for Cancer Research, the American Medical Women's Association, the American Society for Nutrition, and the Linus Pauling Institute. The symposium was underwritten by the Tea Council of the USA. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Tea Council of the USA or the cosponsoring organizations. This work was partially supported by NIH grant R01CA144034. Address correspondence to J-M Yuan, 5150 Centre Avenue, UPMC Cancer Pavilion Suite 4C, Pittsburgh, PA 15232. E-mail: Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla.. Abstract In contrast to the consistent results of an inhibitory effect of green tea extracts and tea polyphenols on the development and growth of carcinogen-induced tumors in experimental…
AJCN Nutrition. October 2013 Jian-Min Yuan + Author Affiliations From the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.+ Author Notes Presented at the conference “Fifth International Scientific Symposium on Tea and Human Health,” held at the US Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC, 19 September 2012. The conference was organized by Jeffrey Blumberg, Tufts University, Boston, MA, and a Steering Committee including representatives from each of the symposium cosponsors: the American Cancer Society, the American College of Nutrition, the American Institute for Cancer Research, the American Medical Women's Association, the American Society for Nutrition, and the Linus Pauling Institute. The symposium was underwritten by the Tea Council of the USA. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Tea Council of the USA or the cosponsoring organizations. This work was partially supported by NIH grant R01CA144034. Address correspondence to J-M Yuan, 5150 Centre Avenue, UPMC Cancer Pavilion Suite 4C, Pittsburgh, PA 15232. E-mail: Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla.. Abstract In contrast to the consistent results of an inhibitory effect of green tea extracts and tea polyphenols on the development and growth of…

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  • One Line Library. October 2013
Abstract Objective: Sulforaphane (SFN) has been reported to regulate signalling pathways relevant to chronic diseases. Our study investigated the impact of sulforaphane treatment on signalling pathways in chondrocytes and whether sulforaphane could block cartilage destruction in osteoarthritis.

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  • The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. October 2013
  Vasanti S Malik, An Pan, Walter C Willett, and Frank B Hu+ Author Affiliations 1From the Departments of Nutrition (VSM, WCW, and FBH) and Epidemiology (WCW and FBH), Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; the Channing Division of Network Medicine (WCW and FBH), Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and the Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health and Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore (AP).+ Author Notes ↵2 Supported by the NIH (grants DK58845, P30 DK46200, U54CA155626, and HL60712). ↵3 Address correspondence to VS Malik, Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 655 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. E-mail: Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla.. Abstract Background: The relation between sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and body weight remains controversial. Objective: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the evidence in children and adults. Design: We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases through March 2013 for prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the SSB-weight relation. Separate meta-analyses were conducted in children and adults and for cohorts and RCTs by using random- and fixed-effects models.

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  • Publimed. October 2013
  Madssen E, Laugsand LE, Wiseth R, Mørkedal B, Platou C, Vatten L, Janszky I.SourceDepartment of Circulation and Medical Imaging Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.AbstractBACKGROUND:Endogenous estrogens prevent lipid peroxidation, which is pivotal in atherogenesis. Dyslipidemia may therefore be more dangerous for men than for women as a risk factor for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). A differential effect by sex has not been empirically established.METHODS:In a prospective population-based cohort study of 23,525 women and 20,725 men younger than 60 years of age at baseline, we followed participants for 12 years for a first AMI. By calculating the proportion of AMI among men with dyslipidemia attributable to the synergism between male sex and dyslipidemia, we assessed the degree to which dyslipidemia is more detrimental for men than for women.

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  • MedPage Today. September 2013
An unhealthy lifestyle markedly increased the risk of disability -- defined as difficulty or dependency in carrying out activities essential to independent living -- in a prospective cohort of people 65 and older, researchers reported. People who were physically inactive, had a diet poor in fruits and vegetables, and either smoked or had recently quit were more than twice as likely to develop disability as those who had none of the unhealthy behaviors, according to Alexis Elbaz, MD, PhD, of the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale in Villejuif, France, and colleagues. On the other hand, there was no association between disability and alcohol, Elbaz and colleagues reported online in BMJ.

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  • MedPage Today. September 2013
By Charles Bankhead , Staff Writer, MedPage TodayReviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner People who consider themselves physically inactive have an increased risk of stroke, adding to previous evidence of the association, results of a large cohort study showed. Self-reported low activity was associated with a 20% increase in stroke risk, as compared with people who reported higher levels of physical activity, according to Michelle N. McDonnell, PhD, of the University of South Australia in Adelaide, and co-authors. Adjustment for traditional stroke risk factors reduced the impact of physical activity to 14% excess risk, which was no longer statistically significant, they reported online in Stroke. "Any effect of physical activity is likely to be mediated through reducing traditional risk factors," the authors wrote.

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  • Eurekalert. September 2013
Neural stem cells proliferate in the subventricular zone and hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult mammals. However, the number of endogenous neural stem cells is insufficient to prevent cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injuries such as vascular dementia, so it is important to stimulate endogenous neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation. The ginkgo biloba extract EGb761 effectively and safely treats memory loss and cognitive impairments in patients with senile dementia. Prof. Yuliang Wang and team from Weifang Medical University observed the effects of EGb761 on proliferation of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and dentate gyrus of rats with vascular dementia. 

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  • Publimed. August 2013
Maddock J, Berry DJ, Geoffroy MC, Power C, Hyppönen E.SourceCentre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics, UCL Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK. Electronic address: Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla..AbstractBACKGROUND & AIMS:The relationship between vitamin D and common mental disorders (CMDs) remains unclear. We aimed to determine if behaviours affecting vitamin D concentrations differ between individuals with or without CMDs and evaluate, cross-sectionally and prospectively, the extent to which the association between 25(OH)D and CMDs are explained by these behaviours.

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  • The Journal of Neuroscience. August 2013
Yu-Shang Lee1,3, Ching-Yi Lin1,3, Hai-Hong Jiang2,4, Marc DePaul5, Vernon W. Lin3, and Jerry Silver5+ Author Affiliations 1Departments of Neurosciences,2Biomedical Engineering, and3Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and4Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, and5Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106Author contributions: Y.-S.L., V.W.L., and J.S. designed research; Y.-S.L., C.-Y.L., H.-H.J., M.D., and J.S. performed research; Y.-S.L. contributed unpublished reagents/analytic tools; Y.-S.L., C.-Y.L., and J.S. analyzed data; Y.-S.L. and J.S. wrote the paper. Abstract A life-threatening disability after complete spinal cord injury is urinary dysfunction, which is attributable to lack of regeneration of supraspinal pathways that control the bladder.  

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  • Medpagetoday. August 2013
  By Charlene Laino, Senior Writer, Gupta Guide Reviewed by F. Perry Wilson, MD, MSCE; Instructor of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Plannersave|AA Action Points Note that this study was published as an abstract and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. Note that this small cohort study demonstrated that exercise was effective at reducing body fat in previously sedentary adolescent girls. Be aware that body weight did not change in any arm, perhaps due to the lack of caloric restriction in any arm. CHICAGO -- In obese teenage girls, both aerobic exercise and resistance training were effective at reducing total fat -- even if the girls didn't cut calories or lose weight, researchers found. Aerobic exercise was also associated with reductions in visceral obesity and liver fat and improvements in insulin sensitivity, SoJung Lee, PhD, of Pittsburgh Children's Hospital, reported here at the American Diabetes Association meeting. Previous research by Lee and colleagues has shown that increasing physical activity -- without caloric restriction -- is effective in reducing total, fat, visceral obesity, and liver…

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  • Publimed. July 2013
Smith AJ, Phipps WR, Thomas W, Schmitz KH, Kurzer MS. SourceDepartment of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55108, USA. AbstractBACKGROUND:It is well accepted that exercise can decrease breast cancer risk. Limited clinical evidence suggests that this risk could be mediated through changes in estrogen metabolism in premenopausal women. Our objective was to investigate the effects of exercise on premenopausal estrogen metabolism pertinent to breast cancer risk.

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  • Eurekalert. July 2013
  Longer sleep duration is associated with an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer among individuals who are overweight or snore regularly A new study is the first to report a significant positive association between long sleep duration and the development of colorectal cancer, especially among individuals who are overweight or snore regularly. The results raise the possibility that obstructive sleep apnea may contribute to cancer risk. "Our current study adds to the very limited literature regarding the relationship between sleep duration and/or sleep quality and colorectal cancer risk," said lead author Xuehong Zhang, MD, ScD, instructor in the Department of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and associate epidemiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "The novel observation of increased risk among regular snorers who sleep long raises the possibility that sleep apnea and its attendant intermittent hypoxemia may contribute to cancer risk."  

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  • Medpagetoday. July 2013
  SAN FRANCISCO -- Giving testosterone to men with type 2 diabetes who are deficient in the hormone improved their insulin sensitivity, researchers reported here. In a randomized, controlled trial, type 2 diabetic men with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism had a significant 25% increase in insulin sensitivity after taking testosterone injections for 6 months, compared with no significant changes for men in the placebo group (P=0.01), Paresh Dandona, MD, PhD, of the University of Buffalo, and colleagues reported at the Endocrine Society meeting here. "The conclusion from all of this is that hypogonadism in type 2 diabetes ... leads to an insulin-resistant state and a pro-inflammatory state, and that pro-inflammatory state may be contributing to insulin resistance by interfering with insulin signaling," Dandona said during a press briefing. But, he added, taking testosterone for 6 months "reverses almost altogether the insulin-resistant state and exerts anti-inflammatory effects, consistent with the reversal of the mechanisms that lead to insulin resistance." Studies have shown that about a third of all men with type 2 diabetes have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and researchers have questioned whether these patients will have worse insulin resistance. To assess insulin resistance in this population -- as well as the effects of treatment…

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  • The American journal of Clinical Nutrition. May 2013
Objective: In this cohort study, we aimed to investigate associations between intakes and serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B-12 or serum tHcy and 10-y AMD incidence. Design: Serum folate, vitamin B-12, and tHcy were determined from blood samples drawn in 1997–1999 from cohort members aged ≥55 y. AMD was assessed in 1760 survivors from retinal photographs taken in 2002–2004 and 2007–2009. Total intakes of folate and vitamin B-12 were assessed by using a food-frequency questionnaire. Results: After adjustment for age, sex, current smoking, white cell count, and fish consumption, each 1-SD increase in serum tHcy was associated with increased risk of incident early and any AMD [ORs (95% CIs): 1.33 (1.09, 1.63) and 1.33 (1.11, 1.60), respectively]. Participants with a serum vitamin B-12 deficiency (<185 pmol/L) had higher risk of incident early and late AMD [ORs (95% CIs): 1.58 (1.06, 2.36) and 2.56 (1.38, 4.73), respectively. Folate deficiency (<11 nmol/L) was associated with 75% and 89% increased risk of incident early and any AMD, respectively, 10 y later. Participants who reported supplementary vitamin B-12 intake had 47% reduced risk of incident any AMD (OR: 0.53; 95% CI: 0.33, 0.85). Conclusion: Elevated serum tHcy and folate and vitamin B-12 deficiencies…

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  • Publimed. May 2013
Higher signaling of the orexin peptides at the orexin receptors (OXR) protects against obesity, but it is less clear how their activation in different brain regions contributes to this behavioral output. This review summarizes the evidence available for a role of central OXR in energy homeostasis and their contribution to obesity. A detailed analysis of anatomical, cellular and behavioral evidence shows that modulation of energy homeostasis by the OXR is largely dependent upon anatomical and cellular context. It also shows that obesity resistance provided by activation of the OXR is distributed across multiple brain sites with site-specific actions. We suggest that understanding the role of the OXR in the development of obesity requires considering both specific mechanisms within brain regions and interactions of orexinergic input between multiple sites.

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  • Consumer Healthday. June 2013
Consumer Healthday. June 2013 Spinal measurement was tied to whether seniors in study would need help with routine activities (HealthDay News) -- The shape of an older person's spine may predict their future need for home assistance or admission to a nursing home, according to a new Japanese study. The findings appeared online recently in the Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. The study included more than 800 people aged 65 and older in Japan, who underwent four types of spinal measurement. The researchers found that only one of the measurements was associated with becoming dependent on help for activities of daily living. These activities include basic self-care tasks such as bathing, feeding, using the toilet, dressing and getting in or out of a bed or chair. The measurement that predicted the need of assistance is called the "trunk angle of inclination." This is the angle between the true vertical and straight line from the first thoracic vertebra (near the head) to the first sacral vertebra (in the lower spine), the researchers said in a journal news release. Over four and a half years of follow-up, about 16 percent of the participants became dependent on help…

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  • Eurekalert. June 2013
Eurekalert. June 2013 BOSTON — New research published as abstracts in The FASEB Journal and presented at Experimental Biology 2013 (EB 2013) ties mushrooms to potential health outcomes – demonstrating that mushrooms provide more to a dish than just flavor. Nine mushroom research abstracts were presented at Experimental Biology this week, which found: Weight Loss and Maintenance: A one-year, randomized clinical trial found that substituting white button mushrooms for red meat can be a useful strategy for enhancing and maintaining weight loss.1 (Lawrence Cheskin, M.D., F.A.C.P., Department of Health, Behavior and Society at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, MD)Better Diet Quality: Mushroom consumption is associated with better diet quality and increased intake of some nutrients according to an analysis of adult participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2001-2010).2 (Carol O'Neil, Ph.D., R.D., Louisiana State University, Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA). Vitamin D levels: Randomized studies of healthy adults show that eating dried white button mushroom extract containing vitamin D2 can be as effective at increasing and maintaining vitamin D levels (25–hydroxyvitamin D) as taking supplemental vitamin D2 or vitamin D3.3,4,5 (Michael F. Holick PhD., M.D. Department of Medicine, Section Endocrinology, Nutrition And…

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  • Life Extension Update. June 2013
Life Extension Update. June 2013 A study reported at the American Urological Association's meeting held this year in San Diego found that men who used testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) had a similar risk of developing cancer in comparison with those who did not use the hormone. "Given that some cancers are androgen dependent, there is concern that testosterone replacement therapy will increase a man's risk of developing cancer," Michael L. Eisenberg, MD of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and his associates write. "To date there are no long term, prospective studies which evaluate the incidence of cancer in men on testosterone supplementation." The study included 786 men who had data available concerning their serum testosterone levels. The subjects' age averaged 46.8 years upon initiation of testosterone therapy or at the first office visit recorded in the researchers' database. Three hundred ninety-seven men were receiving testosterone replacement. Texas Cancer Registry data revealed cancer diagnoses for 6.8% of the men using testosterone and 8.1% of nonusers over an 8.7 year average period. After adjustment for age and year of evaluation, no significant difference in cancer risk was observed between the two groups. Limiting the analysis to men with more than ten…

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  • Life Extension Update. June 2013
Life Extension Update. June 2013 Tuesday, June 11, 2013. In an article published online on May 29, 2013 in the journal Ageing Research Reviews, researchers from The Netherlands report an association between reduced serum levels or intake of vitamin D and a greater risk of cognitive decline. For their review, M. H. Emmelot-Vonk and colleagues at University Medical Center Utrecht selected 25 cross-sectional studies (which examine a specific population at one point in time) and six prospective studies (which follow a group of subjects over a given period of time) that examined the association between vitamin D status and cognition. The cross-sectional studies included a total of 48,680 men and women, and the prospective studies included 10,896 subjects who were followed for 4 to 7 years.

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  • The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. June 2013
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. June 2013 Maarten J Vosselman, Boudewijn Brans, Anouk AJJ van der Lans, Roel Wierts, Marleen A van Baak, Felix M Mottaghy, Patrick Schrauwen, and Wouter D van Marken Lichtenbelt+ Author Affiliations From the Department of Human Biology, NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center+ Maastricht, Netherlands (MJV, AAJJvdL, MAvB, PS, and WDvML), and the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Center+ Maastricht, Netherlands (BB, RW, and FMM).+ Author Notes Supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (TOP 91209037 to WDvML) and the EU FP7 project DIABAT (HEALTH-F2-2011- 278373). Address correspondence to WD van Marken Lichtenbelt, NUTRIM, School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, PO Box 616, 6200 MD Maastricht, Netherlands, E-mail:  Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla. . Abstract Background: Studies in rodents have shown that brown adipose tissue (BAT) is activated on food intake, thereby reducing metabolic efficiency. Objective: The current study investigated whether a single high-calorie, carbohydrate-rich meal activates BAT in lean human adults. Design: BAT activity was studied in 11 lean adult men [age: 23.6 ± 2.1 y; body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2): 22.4 ± 2.1] after consumption of a high-calorie, carbohydrate-rich meal (1622 ± 222…

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  • Publimed. May 2013
Publimed. May 2013 Palatini P, Saladini F, Mos L, Benetti E, Bortolazzi A, Cozzio S, Casiglia E. SourceDepartment of Medicine, Clinica Medica 4, University of Padova, Padova, Italy.  Esta dirección de correo electrónico está protegida contra spambots. Usted necesita tener Javascript activado para poder verla. AbstractOBJECTIVE:To examine the impact of overweight and obesity on development of target organ damage in the early stage of hypertension. SUBJECTS:Participants were 727 young-to-middle-age subjects screened for stage 1 hypertension and followed for 8 years. MEASUREMENTS:Ambulatory blood pressure (BP), albumin excretion rate and echocardiographic data were obtained at entry, every 5 years and/or before starting antihypertensive treatment. RESULTS:During the follow-up, hypertension needing treatment was developed by 54.7% of the subjects with normal weight, 66.6% of those with overweight and 73.0% of those with obesity (P<0.001). Kaplan-Meier curves showed that patients with obesity or overweight progressed to sustained hypertension earlier than those with normal weight (P<0.001). At study end, rate of organ damage was 10.7% in the normal weight, 16.4% in the overweight and 30.1% in the obese subjects (P<0.001). In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, overweight (P=0.008) and obesity (P<0.001) were significant predictors of final organ damage. Inclusion of changes in 24-h BP and body mass index, and of baseline organ damage did not virtually modify these associations (P=0.002 and <0.001, respectively).…

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  • International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. April 2013
Research into the area of male health is gaining momentum in countries across the world, and has been highlighted by the release of a range of male-specific health reports and policies [1-4]. Australian males experience higher rates of a range of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), in comparison to their female counterparts [1]. Australian data from 2007 showed that cancer and other tumours were the leading cause of death in both males and females aged between 45 and 64 years, while CVD, including both coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, was the second highest cause of death in this age group [5].   It has been well established that participation in regular physical activity has the potential to reduce a person’s risk of developing various chronic diseases [6,7]. Among middle-aged and older males, specifically, physical activity has been found to be inversely associated with CHD risk [8,9], hypertension [8], cancer mortality [10], and CVD mortality [11]. Further, greater leisure time physical activity (LTPA), has been associated with reduced diabetes risk [12], while high lifetime occupational physical activity has been shown to be protective against colon and prostate cancer in adult males [13].   Researchers have established…

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  • Eurekalert. April 2013
Prof. Bauer and his colleagues examined the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on SLO1 channels of the cardiovascular system by experimenting with mice. "Administration of DHA should result in an expansion of the blood vessels and consequently a drop in blood pressure," the physician says. The laboratory experiments confirmed exactly that. In genetically modified mice however, which were not able to produce the SLO1 channel, the antihypertensive impact of DHA failed to appear. "Thus we were able to show for the first time that DHA directly influences the blood pressure, which is being mediated through SLO1 channels," Bauer summarizes.   Beyond that, the scientists made another surprising discovery: a variant of DHA, which can often be found in nutritional supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids, doesn't show an antihypertensive effect. Moreover, it suppresses and even diminishes the effect of the natural DHA from fish oil. "The intake of non-natural omega-3 fatty acids can therefore also have counter-productive effects," Prof. Bauer stresses. This is of particular importance for the nutritional supplements of patients in intensive care who are being drip-fed: their supplements of omega-3 fatty acids should be specifically aimed at and adapted to the patients' clinical requirements.   Original Publications:  …

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  • Obesity, Fitness & Wellness Week April, 2013
But they cautioned that participants in the study lived in a Mediterranean country and were already at high risk for cardiovascular events, so it is not clear how well the results will apply to other people.   Nonetheless, the trial's data and safety monitoring board ruled late in 2011 that the benefits were sufficiently clear that the study should be stopped, Estruch and colleagues reported online in the New England Journal of Medicine.   The traditional Mediterranean diet, the researchers noted, is characterized by lots of olive oil, fruit, nuts, vegetables, legumes, and cereals, some fish and poultry, and limited amounts of dairy products, red meat, processed meats, and sweets. As well, the diet includes moderate amounts of wine with meals.   To test the idea that the diet protected against heart disease, the researchers randomly assigned 7,447 people, ages 55 to 80, to one of three diets -- a Mediterranean diet with additional unrefined (or extra-virgin) olive oil, a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts (mainly walnuts), or a control diet, which consisted essentially of advice to reduce dietary fat.   The majority of the participants were women (57%) and were free of cardiovascular disease when they started, but…

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  • Publimed. March 2013
Publimed. March 2013 Zhang Y, Tang ZH, Ren Z, Qu SL, Liu MH, Liu LS, Jiang ZS. Source Institute of Cardiovascular Disease and Key Lab for Arteriosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang City, Hunan Province, People's Republic of China. Abstract Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is the third endogenous signaling gasotransmitter, following nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. It is physiologically generated by cystathionine-γ-lyase, cystathionine-β-synthase, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase. H(2)S has been gaining increasing attention as an important endogenous signaling molecule because of its significant effects on the cardiovascular and nervous systems. Substantial evidence shows that H(2)S is involved in aging by inhibiting free-radical reactions, activating SIRT1, and probably interacting with the age-related gene Klotho. Moreover, H(2)S has been shown to have therapeutic potential in age-associated diseases. This article provides an overview of the physiological functions and effects of H(2)S in aging and age-associated diseases, and proposes the potential health and therapeutic benefits of H(2)S.

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  • Eurekalert. March 2013
Eurekalert. March 2013 Cohabiting associated with better prognosis after coronary events before and after hospitalization Sophia Antipolis, 31 January 2013. A large population-based study from Finland has shown that being unmarried increases the risk of fatal and non-fatal heart attack in both men and women whatever their age. Conversely, say the study investigators, especially among middle-aged couples, being married and cohabiting are associated with "considerably better prognosis of acute cardiac events both before hospitalization and after reaching the hospital alive". The study, published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, was based on the FINAMI myocardial infarction register data from the years 1993 to 2002.(1,2) The study included information on people over the age of 35 living in four geographical regions of Finland. All fatal and non-fatal cardiac events - known as "acute cardiac syndromes", ACS - were included and cross-referred to the population database. "Our aim," said the authors, "was to study the differences in the morbidity and prognosis of incident acute coronary syndromes according to socio-demographic characteristics (marital status and household size)." The register recorded 15,330 ACS events over the study period of ten years, with just over half (7703) resulting in death within 28 days. Events…

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  • Medpage Today. March 2013
Medpage Today. March 2013 In NHS, which began in 1976, women (ages 30 to 55) living in states with the highest ultraviolet B (UVB) intensity had a 21% lower risk for RA compared with those living in states with low UVB levels (hazard ratio 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.94, P=0.005 for trend), according to Elizabeth Arkema, PhD, and colleagues from Harvard University. But in NHSII, initiated in 1989 in women ages 25 to 42, no significantly lower risk was seen (HR 1.12, 95% CI 0.87 to 1.44, P=0.37 for trend), the researchers reported online in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. "The later birth cohort of NHSII participants (born between 1946 and 1964) were more likely aware of the dangers of sun exposure and, perhaps, had more sun-protective behavior, making residential UVB not as good a proxy for actual sun exposure in NHSII," they suggested. Epidemiologic studies have found a correlation between an increased incidence of RA and other autoimmune diseases with higher latitude of residence. In addition, experimental studies have demonstrated immunosuppressive effects of UVB, such as through influences on T-cells and cytokines. Exposure to UVB also increases vitamin D synthesis in the skin, which, in turn, has immunomodulatory…

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  • Publimed. March 2013
Publimed. March 2013 Background/objectives:Vitamin D has anti-inflammatory and immune-regulating properties. We aimed to determine if high-dose cholecalciferol supplementation for 1 year in subjects with early chronic kidney disease (CKD) improved circulating markers of inflammation and immunity. Subjects/methods:In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 46 subjects with early CKD (stages 2 and 3) were supplemented with oral cholecalciferol (50 000 IU weekly for 12 weeks followed by 50 000 IU every other week for 40 weeks) or a matching placebo for 1 year. Serum tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interferon gamma-induced protein-10 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin were measured at baseline, 12 weeks and 1 year. Serum cathelicidin (LL-37) was measured at baseline and 12 weeks. An in vitro experiment was performed to investigate the effect of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)D) treatment on MCP-1 secretion in THP-1 monocytes activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.Results:By 12 weeks, serum MCP-1 decreased in the cholecalciferol group (66.2±2.5 to 60.8±2.6 pg/ml, group-by-time interaction P=0.02) but was not different from baseline at 1 year. Other markers of inflammation and immunity did not change. In vitro, LPS- and Pseudomonas-activated monocytes treated with 1,25(OH)D had significantly less MCP-1 secretion compared with untreated cells.Conclusions:High-dose cholecalciferol decreased serum MCP-1…

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  • Infomed.February 2013
Infomed.February 2013 Investigadores de la Universidad de Bristol han descubierto la que podría ser la clave para el desarrollo de terapias seguras para el tratamiento de la obesidad y sus patologías asociadas, según una investigación publicada en Cell (doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2012.12.022). A través de esta investigación, realizada con la colaboración de la Fundación Británica del Corazón (BHF), se ha identificado que el factor que determina la regulación del peso en el cerebro está también asociado al desarrollo de las patologías asociadas a la obesidad. Los investigadores han descrito el mecanismo de una molécula clave, conocida como receptor de la melanocortina 4 (MC4R), que ha demostrado que su pérdida tanto en animales como en humanos provoca obesidad con diabetes tipo 2. Los científicos han identificado un mecanismo a través de la regulación de la molécula MC4R para la actividad del sistema nervioso autónomo para mantener la presión arterial y los niveles de insulina en la sangre adecuados. Además han demostrado que la activación del MC4R inhibe las neuronas parasimpáticas en el cerebro correspondientes al área del sistema nervioso autónomo, activando mientras las neuronas simpáticas en la médula espinal. También han demostrado que el MC4R en las áreas del sistema nervioso autónomo son…

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  • Nutrition Journal. February 2013
Nutrition Journal. February 2013 Wei Zhu, Donglian Cai, Ying Wang, Ning Lin, Qingqing Hu, Yang Qi, Shuangshuang Ma and Sidath Amarasekara For all author emails, please log on. Nutrition Journal 2013, 12:8 doi:10.1186/1475-2891-12-8 Published: 8 January 2013 Abstract (provisional) Background Recent evidence suggests that higher calcium and/or vitamin D intake may be associated with lower body weight and better metabolic health. Due to contradictory findings from intervention trials, we investigated the effect of calcium plus vitamin D3 (calcium+D) supplementation on anthropometric and metabolic profiles during energy restriction in healthy, overweight and obese adults with very-low calcium consumption. Methods Fifty-three subjects were randomly assigned in an open-label, randomized controlled trial to receive either an energy-restricted diet (-500 kcal/d) supplemented with 600 mg elemental calcium and 125 IU vitamin D3 or energy restriction alone for 12 weeks. Repeated measurements of variance were performed to evaluate the differences between groups for changes in body weight, BMI, body composition, waist circumference, and blood pressures, as well as in plasma TG, TC, HDL, LDL, glucose and insulin concentrations. Results Eighty-one percent of participants completed the trial (85% from the calcium + D group; 78% from the control group). A significantly greater decrease in fat mass…

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  • PubMed. February 2013
PubMed. February 2013 Barrett EL, Burke TA, Hammers M, Komdeur J, Richardson DS. School of Biological Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, Norfolk NR4 7TJ, UK. Explaining variation in life expectancy between individuals of the same age is fundamental to our understanding of population ecology and life history evolution. Variation in the length and rate of loss of the protective telomere chromosome caps has been linked to cellular lifespan. Yet, the extent to which telomere length and dynamics predict organismal lifespan in nature is still contentious. Using longitudinal samples taken from a closed population of Acrocephalus sechellensis (Seychelles warblers) studied for over 20 years, we describe the first study into life-long adult telomere dynamics (1-17 years) and their relationship to mortality under natural conditions (n = 204 individuals). We show that telomeres shorten with increasing age and body mass, and that shorter telomeres and greater rates of telomere shortening predicted future mortality. Our results provide the first clear and unambiguous evidence of a relationship between telomere length and mortality in the wild, and substantiate the prediction that telomere length and shortening rate can act as an indicator of biological age further to chronological age when exploring life…

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  • American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report. February 2013
American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report. February 2013 Eating three or more servings of blueberries and strawberries per week may help women reduce their risk of a heart attack by as much as one-third, researchers reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. Blueberries and strawberries contain high levels of naturally occurring compounds called dietary flavonoids, also found in grapes and wine, blackberries, eggplant, and other fruits and vegetables. A specific sub-class of flavonoids, called anthocyanins, may help dilate arteries, counter the buildup of plaque and provide other cardiovascular benefits, according to the study. "Blueberries and strawberries can easily be incorporated into what women eat every week," said Eric Rimm D.Sc., senior author and Associate Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Mass. "This simple dietary change could have a significant impact on prevention efforts." Blueberries and strawberries were part of this analysis simply because they are the most-eaten berries in the United States. Thus, it's possible that other foods could produce the same results, researchers said. Scientists from the Harvard School of Public Health in the United States and the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom conducted a prospective study…

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  • Life Extension Update. January 2013
Life Extension Update. January 2013 The January, 2013 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology published the finding of Danish researchers of reductions in glucose tolerance and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) levels in men treated with simvastatin, one of several statin drugs commonly prescribed to lower high cholesterol. While the drugs are of benefit to millions of people at risk for cardiovascular events, their effect on coenzyme Q10, an important mitochondrial cofactor, has not been well publicized in mainstream medical media. (Mitochondria are the cells' energy-producing organelles.) In their introduction to the article, Professor Flemming Dela of Copenhagen's Center for Healthy Aging and his associates remark that although statin drugs have a positive effect on heart muscle via the increase in antioxidant capacity and reduction of reactive oxygen species production, an adverse effect on skeletal muscle has been reported. Statin-associated muscle pain has been reported in approximately 10 percent of sedentary patients and in up to 75 percent of athletes. However, the incidence of myopathy in clinical trials of the drugs has been much lower, presumably due to a discrepancy in the definition of myopathy. "A well-known side effect of statin therapy is muscle pain," Dr Dela explained. …

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  • Springer link. January 2013
Springer link. January 2013 A. E. Vieira Senger, C. H. A. Schwanke, I. Gomes, Maria Gabriela Valle Gottlieb Look Inside Get Access Abstract Objective To evaluate the effect of the consumption of green tea on components of MS in the elderly. Design Intervention study. Setting The sample was selected from the Geriatric Service of Hospital São Lucas of Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul. Participants 45 elderly with MS were enrolled and allocated into two groups: green tea group (GTG, n = 24), who drank green tea and control group (CG, n= 21) without intervention. Intervention The GTG received sachets of 1.0 g of green tea, and should drink three cups per day for 60 days and the CG was instructed not to make changes in their lifestyle. Measurements The diagnostic criteria for MS used were the International Diabetes Federation. The lipidic and glycemie profile, and anthropometric measurements were evaluated before and after intervention. Results There was a statistically significant weight loss only in GTG [71.5±12.6 kg to 70.3±12.6 kg (p

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  • MedPage Today. January 2013
MedPage Today. January 2013 By Kristina Fiore, Staff Writer, MedPage Today Explain that for early menopausal women, more wrinkles was associated with lower bone mineral density. Note that having more glabellar wrinkles on the forehead was related to lower bone density at the femoral neck, while increasing skin rigidity at the face and the forehead was tied to stronger bones at the hip and spine. BOSTON -- A woman's worry lines could make her clinician fret about her bone health, researchers said here. In a cross-sectional analysis, having more wrinkles was associated with having lower bone mineral density (BMD; P

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  • Adelaide. January 2013
Adelaide. January 2013 Mistletoe has become an important symbol of Christmas but it also has the potential to play a vital role as an alternative therapy for Australian sufferers of colon cancer. At the University of Adelaide, scientists are interested in how the extract of mistletoe could either assist chemotherapy or act as an alternative to chemotherapy as a treatment for colon cancer. Colon cancer is the second greatest cause of cancer death in the Western world. Mistletoe extract is already authorised for use by sufferers of colon cancer in Europe, but not in Australia due to a lack of scientific testing. For her Honours research project recently completed at the University of Adelaide, Health Sciences student Zahra Lotfollahi compared the effectiveness of three different types of mistletoe extract and chemotherapy on colon cancer cells. She also compared the impact of mistletoe extract and chemotherapy on healthy intestinal cells. In her laboratory studies, she found that one of the mistletoe extracts - from a species known as Fraxini (which grows on ash trees) - was highly effective against colon cancer cells and was gentler on healthy intestinal cells compared with chemotherapy. Significantly, Fraxini extract was found to be more potent…
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